The much-anticipated adaptation of Malorie Blackman’s award-winning young adult book series Noughts + Crosses has begun filming in South Africa for BBC One.

Published in 2001, Noughts & Crosses is the gripping story of first love in a dangerous, alternate world where racism divides society. Filming has already begun on the six-part BBC One drama and it is being produced by Mammoth Screen.

Noughts & Crosses

The adaptation of the novel’s storyline follows the complicated relationship between two young people – Sephy Hadley and Callum McGregor – in a British world where racial dynamics have been reversed. Sephy is a ‘Cross’, daughter of a domineering politician and a member of the ruling black class, whereas Callum is a ‘Nought’, a white-skinned boy belonging to a family and race suffering from poverty and segregation. It’s the story of two families separated by power and prejudice but forever entwined by fate.

Playing the role of Sephy is newcomer Masali Baduza, and Jack Rowan as Callum (Born to Kill and Peaky Blinders). The monumental book won Red House Children’s Book Award and the Fantastic Fiction Award among other accolades, with Malorie Blackman holding the honour of the Children’s Laureate from 2013 to 2015.

Malorie Blackman said: “I’m thrilled that the TV dramatization of Noughts + Crosses has such an amazing cast to bring the story to the screen. It will be so exciting to see how the writers and actors open up the world I created, adding new breadth and detail.”

Noughts & Crosses
Malorie Blackman

Each episode will be an hour long, with Executive Producer, Preethi Mavahalli saying: “It is an absolute honour to be adapting this treasured novel for television. We are delighted to have such a phenomenal cast bringing this iconic love story to the screen for both existing fans and a whole new audience.”

From written words to moving pictures, the wait for the show’s release will surely be worth it!

 

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